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TOPIC: Does anyone have RSD in phase III?

Does anyone have RSD in phase III? 9 years 8 months ago #29569

  • BobinmidMO
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I know that the site lists this as only being for CRPS/RSD with phase I and II, but is there anyone out there who would like to discuss what this disease is when it hits phase III.

In no way do I want to offend or break any rules regarding this site, but since I personally am in full blown plase III, it would be great to meet others in my situation.<br><br>Post edited by: BobinmidMO, at: 2010/02/26 19:54

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Re:Does anyone have RSD in phase III? 9 years 8 months ago #29577

Hello Bob :)

Its ok to discuss all types of Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy\Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, (RSD/CRPS).

I know Karl Dean welcomes all to Ablehere.Com & I am welcome to meet an other Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy\Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (RSD/CRPS) Suffer & Any Pain/Disability Suffer.

I know Your get a WARM Welcome From Other Ablehere.Com Members :)

Hope You Enjoy sharing Your challenges & experiences with The Diagnose Of Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy\Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (RSD/CRPS).

Take Care & Take It Easy :)

Looking forward to reading Your other threads/posts :)

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Re:Does anyone have RSD in phase III? 9 years 5 months ago #30111

BobinmidMO wrote:

I know that the site lists this as only being for CRPS/RSD with phase I and II, but is there anyone out there who would like to discuss what this disease is when it hits phase III.

In no way do I want to offend or break any rules regarding this site, but since I personally am in full blown plase III, it would be great to meet others in my situation.<br><br>Post edited by: BobinmidMO, at: 2010/02/26 19:54


Hi Bob,

I hope You know that Reflex Sympathetic DystrophyComplex Regional Pain Syndrome 1&2 (RSD/CRPS 1&2) Is Refering To The Only 2 Types Of RSD/CRPS & Not The 1 - 3 Stages/Phases Of RSD/CRPS 1&2 Can Go Through, Right?.

crps1and2rsd1and2.multiply.com/journal/item/1

Everyone counts & We'd welcome Your opinions/views & Own Exprinces.

I understand there only 2 types of RSD/CRPS & They come in 3 different Stages/Phases.

There's Non-Nerve-Injury RSD/CRPS & Nerve-Injury RSD/CRPS, Which Both Have 3 Stages/Phases.

All Though I Am Not A Specialist, But This Is My Understanding.

CRPS Type 1 - Also Know As: Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy, Where The Pain Is Not Associated With An Identifiable Nerver Injury

CRPS Type 2 Also Know As Causalgia Where The Pain Can Be Traced To A Nerver Injury

&

Three Stages/Phases.

crps1and2rsd1and2.multiply.com/journal/item/1

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Re:Does anyone have RSD in phase III? 9 years 5 months ago #30112

Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy/Complex Regional Pain Syndrome 1&2 (RSD/CRPS 1&2) & The 3 Stages/Phases Of RSD/CRPS 1&2 - Chat: www.ablehere.com/component/option,com_jo...ew/id,1330/catid,47/

Everyone counts & We'd welcome Your opinions/views & Own Exprinces.

I understand there only 2 types of RSD/CRPS & They come in 3 different Stages/Phases.

There's Non-Nerve-Injury RSD/CRPS & Nerve-Injury RSD/CRPS, Which Both Have 3 Stages/Phases.

All Though I Am Not A Specialist, But This Is My Understanding.

CRPS Type 1 - Also Know As: Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy, Where The Pain Is Not Associated With An Identifiable Nerver Injury

CRPS Type 2 Also Know As Causalgia Where The Pain Can Be Traced To A Nerver Injury

&

Three Stages/Phases.

crps1and2rsd1and2.multiply.com/journal/item/1

&

Hi Bob,

I hope You know that Reflex Sympathetic DystrophyComplex Regional Pain Syndrome 1&2 (RSD/CRPS 1&2) Is Refering To The Only 2 Types Of RSD/CRPS & Not The 1 - 3 Stages/Phases Of RSD/CRPS 1&2 Can Go Through, Right?.

crps1and2rsd1and2.multiply.com/journal/item/1

Information Below, As Been Copied & Pasted From: www.medifocus.com & www.medifocus.com/mda/index.php?gid=NR015&?a=a & Made In Tiny Earl To @ tinyurl.com/32f33uo

Some experts believe that there are three stages of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) that
represent different clinical stages of the disease process. The progression of these stages has not,
however, been validated by clinical studies.

Information Below, As Been Copied & Pasted From: www.medifocus.com & www.medifocus.com/mda/index.php?gid=NR015&?a=a & Made In Tiny Earl To @ tinyurl.com/32f33uo

The three stages are as follows: www.medifocus.com & www.medifocus.com/mda/index.php?gid=NR015&?a=a & Made In Tiny Earl To @ tinyurl.com/32f33uo

• Stage I usually lasts from one to three months after onset and is characterized by:
• pain - the pain is severe, burning or throbbing and is localized to the limb
• edema - swelling that is usually localized to the affected limb and may have a well
demarcated edge
• skin changes - skin in the area becomes bluish in color and becomes cold and sweaty.
• skin begins to atrophy and becomes shiny.
• increased sweating (hyperhydrosis)
• rapid hair growth
• joint stiffness
• muscle spasm
• early evidence of osteoporosis (thin, weak bone more susceptible to fracture)

• Stage II lasts 3-6 months and is characterized by:
• intensifying pain
• swelling
• weak muscle tone
• hair may become coarse and may be followed by hair loss
• nails may grow faster or slower and may become brittle, spotty, or grooved
• joint stiffness worsens with further reduced range of motion
• softened bones

• Stage III is characterized by:
• unremitting pain and sensory disturbance
• pain may involve the entire limb
• marked muscle atrophy
• severely limited mobility
• significant increase of motor and trophic changes
• irreversible changes of skin and bone
• loss of function and stiffness of the limb
• marked osteoporosis
• involuntary contraction of muscles and tendons which may make limbs contorted. In
the upper extremity, this may take the form of frozen shoulder or \"claw hand\"<br><br>Post edited by: Scott_1984, at: 2010/05/14 08:46

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Re:Does anyone have RSD in phase III? 9 years 3 months ago #30822

BobinmidMO wrote:

I know that the site lists this as only being for CRPS/RSD with phase I and II, but is there anyone out there who would like to discuss what this disease is when it hits phase III.

In no way do I want to offend or break any rules regarding this site, but since I personally am in full blown plase III, it would be great to meet others in my situation.<br><br>Post edited by: BobinmidMO, at: 2010/02/26 19:54


Hi Mid Carpal Instability (MCI)/Palmar Midcarpal Instability (PMCI) Suffers & Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy\Complex Regional Pain Syndrome 1&2 (RSD/CRPS 1&2) & The 3 Stages/Phases Of RSD/CRPS 1&2 Suffers,

Its Me again & Just remembered I had found this USA Legal Firm Years Ago Through Doing My Mid Carpal Instability & Wrist Instability Searches & Legal Cases Too.

Mid Carpal Instability: www.hickeylawfirm.com/html/injuries.html?submit=

Arm, Hand, Wrist, Elbow, and Shoulder:

Arm, hand, wrist, elbow, and shoulder injuries can be the result of fractures, ligament damage, carpal tunnel syndrome, sprains, nerve damage, or muscle problems. Causes of these injuries include repeated job duties (carpel tunnel syndrome), car accidents, sports accidents, work-related accidents, and falls.

The wrist is one of the most complicated joints in the body. The hand is at the top of this joint. In the hand, the bones in the finger meet at the carpal bones. This is a series of eight bones arranged in two rows that articulate - that is, move in relation to - the lower arm bones, the radius and ulna. The lower arm bones, the radius and ulna, move in relation to each other. If the distal end of one those bones, that is the end farthest away from the shoulder, is fractured, it may alter the way the two bones move about each other, and thus, may alter the range of motion and general ability to move.

The Legal Team at Hickey Law Firm, P.A., is experienced with handling many severe hand, wrist, and arm injuries. These injuries have included mid-carpal instability caused by ligament damage to the mid-carpal ligaments in the right hand of a chiropractor who had tripped and fallen onto his hand (resulting in a settlement of $650,000). In that case, the plaintiff received only one surgery, a pinning of two of the bones in the hand. That did not work. There is no type of surgery to repair the ligaments that result in mid-carpal instability. This is instability between the two rows of bones that sit at the top of the forearm bones, radius and ulna, and below the finger bones. This instability resulted in popping of the arm bones whenever the plaintiff moved his right hand and an inability to put weight or pressure on his hand. This is a permanent injury and has caused the plaintiff, a chiropractor, to lose substantial income in his practice.

www.hickeylawfirm.com/html/injuries.html?submit=

&

RSD/CRPS: www.hickeylawfirm.com/html/injuries.html?submit=

We also have been involved with a case in which a restaurant allowed a booth to remain in disrepair. The booth had a hole in the seat. When the Plaintiff put her hand on the seat to slide over, her hand thrust into the hole and onto the edge of a slat underneath the seat. That slat, without breaking the skin, tore or severed the scapho-lumate ligament. That is the ligament that holds together the two bones that are the cornerstone of the bones in the hand, the scaphoid and the lunate bones. Various surgical repairs were attempted on this very serious injury, mostly without results. Our client also suffered Reflex Sympathy Disorder (RSD), which caused her hand to swell, become reddened and mottled, and to be sensitive to both heat and cold. The RSD was treated with 11 nerve block injections. Our client underwent five separate surgeries, three of which were fairly minor. The last surgery was a fusion of her right wrist. Our client was an accountant and now is a part-time bookkeeper and lost income. This case resulted in a jury verdict of $1.733 million.

So In America Thanks To Mr. David Litchman & Other American Consultant Orthopeadic & Trauma Hand & Upper-Limb Surgeons Bring Both Mid Carpal Instability & RSD/CRPS To Light World Wide & In America.

Take Care & Take It Easy :)

*HUGS*

Scott :)

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