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SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) 12 years 11 months ago #807

SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder): en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seasonal_affective_disorder

Seasonal affective disorder, also known as winter depression, is an affective, or mood, disorder.

Most SAD sufferers experience normal mental health throughout most of the year, but experience depressive symptoms in the winter or summer.

The condition in the summer is often referred to as Reverse Seasonal Affective Disorder.<br><br>Post edited by: Scott_1984, at: 2007/10/20 01:31
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Re:SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) 12 years 11 months ago #808

What is SAD?: www.sada.org.uk

SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) is a type of winter depression that affects an estimated half a million people every Winter between September and April, in particular during December, January and February.

It is caused by a biochemical imbalance in the hypothalamus due to the shortening of daylight hours and the lack of sunlight in winter.

For many people SAD is a seriously disabling illness, preventing them from functioning normally without continuous medical treatment.

For others, it is a mild but debilitating condition causing discomfort but not severe suffering. We call this subsyndromal SAD or 'winter blues.'
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Re:SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) 12 years 11 months ago #809

What is SAD?: hcd2.bupa.co.uk/fact_sheets/html/sad.html

Seasonal affective (or mood) disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that occurs at particular times, commonly in the winter months.3

Mild forms of SAD are commonly referred to as \"winter blues\" but some people have a more severe form and these people cannot function in winter without treatment.

For most sufferers of SAD, symptoms get worse in the autumn and winter when the days are shorter, and clear up in spring and summer.

People are more vulnerable to SAD the further away they live from the equator as daylight hours become fewer.4

Some people get SAD in the summer months but this is much less common.
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Re:SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) 12 years 11 months ago #810

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_therapy & en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phototherapy#Seasonal_affective_disorder

Light therapy or phototherapy consists of exposure to specific wavelengths of light using lasers, LEDs, fluorescent lamps, dichroic lamps or very bright, full-spectrum light, for a prescribed amount of time. It has proven effective in treating Acne vulgaris, seasonal affective disorder, and for some people it has ameliorated delayed sleep phase syndrome. It has recently been shown effective in non-seasonal depression. Proponents claim demonstrable benefits for skin conditions such as psoriasis and, more controversially, a degree of \"skin rejuvenation.\"
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Re:SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) 12 years 11 months ago #812

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD)- Dr Rob Hicks (BBC-Health):

SAD is a specific type of depression that affects people at the same time each year - autumn and winter. During spring and summer, people with SAD feel well: www.bbc.co.uk/health/conditions/sad1.shtml
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Re:SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) 12 years 11 months ago #813

What is SAD?: www.nosad.org

SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) is a type of winter depression which affects millions of people every winter between September and April, in particular during December, January and February. SAD is caused by a biochemical imbalance in the hypothalamus due to the shortening of daylight hours and the lack of sunlight in winter. For many people SAD is a seriously disabling illness, preventing them from functioning normally without continuous medical treatment. For others, it is a milder condition, causing discomfort, referred to as sub-syndromal SAD or winter blues. There is also a rare reverse form of SAD, known as summer SAD, where symptoms occur each summer and remit in winter.
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Re:SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) 12 years 11 months ago #814

What Is SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) - UK-NHS: www.nhsdirect.nhs.uk/articles/article.aspx?articleId=333

Seasonal affective disorderIntroductionSeasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a type of depression which has a seasonal pattern. The most common form of SAD is also called 'winter depression' because symptoms are worst in the winter months.

Symptoms tend to start from around September and are worse when the days are shortest (in December, January and February).

By springtime, most people with SAD will improve and symptoms usually disappear. Seasonal affective disorder can sometimes affect people in the summer rather than the winter, but this is rare and has different symptoms.

Around 1 in 50 people in the UK have SAD. The condition affects twice as many women than men.

You can develop SAD at any age, but it is most common in people aged 18-30. Like any type of depression, SAD can be a difficult condition to live with.

Symptoms can leave you feeling tired, lethargic, stressed and unhappy. However, there are a number of treatments and medications available that have been proven to be very effective in treating SAD.

When the sun is out, many people tend to feel happier and more energetic. When it is dark and gloomy, many of us feel more lethargic and less sociable. The amount of sunlight we get can affect our mood, appetite, energy levels and sex drive.

Up to 1 in 8 people in the UK experience these milder symptoms of winter 'blues' (sub-syndromal SAD). For people with SAD however, these feelings and symptoms are much more severe.

Studies around the world have shown that SAD becomes more common the further you are away from the equator. This suggests that SAD is linked to the change in the number of daylight hours through the year.
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Re:SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) 12 years 11 months ago #815

How does light therapy work?: www.nhsdirect.com/articles/article.aspx?...=333&PrintPage=1

You should begin using light therapy treatment in autumn, or as soon as your symptoms begin.

Sit a metre away from the box, facing the light but do not look directly at it.

You may need to spend anything from 30 minutes to 3 hours in front of the box, depending on the strength of the light that it emits. Carry on with every- day tasks, such as reading, eating or working and use the therapy at a time which is convenient for you.

However, it is best to avoid using it late in the evening, as it could make it difficult to get to sleep.

Most people will notice that symptoms improve after three to four days.

However in other people, it can take up to six weeks before they begin to notice a difference.

If light therapy has not worked after using it for 6 weeks, then it is probably not a suitable type of treatment for you.

How do I get light therapy?: www.nhsdirect.com/articles/article.aspx?...=333&PrintPage=1

Light boxes are not currently available on the NHS. If you contact a SAD support group or organisation, such as the Seasonal Affective Disorder Association (see selected links), they should be able to give you a list of suppliers.

Boxes normally start at £100.

There are a range of products available, for example; light visors which shine bright light into your eyes through a portable device fitted into a visor; dawn stimulators which are usually connected to an alarm clock and mimic sunrise, allowing you to wake up gradually.

It is very important that you do not use home-made light units, tanning lights or tanning beds as a form of light therapy.

They are not designed for use with SAD and usually emit a high level of UV rays, which can seriously damage your skin and eyes.

Before undertaking light therapy, it is best to visit your GP to discuss what type of therapy would be best for you.

Your GP will be able to give you advice on how you should be using this type of treatment, and will also be able to advise you on what to do should you suffer from any kind of side effects.

Although light therapy very rarely affects your vision, if you are using it on a regular basis, then it is important that you tell your optician.

You should also ensure that you have an eye test at least once a year.

If you have existing eye problems, it is best that you talk to your GP or optician before undertaking any form of light treatment to ensure it does not aggravate your condition in any way.
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Re:SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) 12 years 9 months ago #1857

According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND, people suffering from depression feel much better after eating a banana.

This is because bananas contain tryptophan, a protein that the body converts into serotonin to make you relax and improve your mood.

Trypotophan can also help sufferers of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD).

Also, if you are stressed or nervous, bananas can help calm you down. Bananas are high in B vitamins that help calm the nervous system.

Bananas also fight stress with potassium, as the mineral helps normalise the heartbeat, sends oxygen to the brain and regulates your body's water-balance.

Source: www.banana.com & www.Texperts.Com & www.mind.org.uk/News+policy+and+campaign...r+Mood+With+Food.htm
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