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Re:An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling 12 years 10 months ago #1532

An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling For Mental Health/Depression: The Conversational Model of Psychotherapy: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conversational_Model_%28The%29

The Conversational Model of Psychotherapy was devised by the English psychiatrist Robert Hobson, and developed by the Australian psychiatrist Russell Meares.

Hobson listened to recordings of his own psychotherapeutic practice with more disturbed clients, and became aware of the ways in which a patient's self - their unique sense of personal being - can come alive and develop, or be destroyed, in the flux of the conversation in the consulting room.

The Conversational Model views the aim of therapy as allowing the growth of the patient's self through encouraging a form of conversational relating called 'aloneness-togetherness'.

This phrase is reminiscent of Winnicott's idea of the importance of being able to be 'alone in the presence of another', and of Rogers' notion of 'unconditional positive regard'.

The client comes to eventually feel recognised, accepted and understood as who they are; their sense of personal being, or self, is fostered; and they can start to drop the destructive defenses which disrupt their sense of personal being.

The development of the self implies a capacity to embody and span the dialectic of 'aloneness-togetherness' - rather than being disposed toward either schizoid isolation (aloneness) or merging identification with the other (togetherness).

Although the therapy is described as psychodynamic, it relies more on careful empathic listening and the development of a common 'feeling language' than it does on psychoanalytic interpretation.
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Re:An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling 12 years 10 months ago #1533

An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling For Mental Health/Depression: Core Process Psychotherapy: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Core_process_psychotherapy

Core Process Psychotherapy is a psychotherapy that practices a Buddhist awareness as the centre of a healing relationship between client and therapist.

It was founded by Maura Sills and Franklyn Sills.

The Karuna Institute, a non-profit charity set in Widecombe-in-the-Moor, Devon, England trains core process psychotherapists including by focussing on birth trauma and using Kum Nye.
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Re:An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling 12 years 10 months ago #1534

An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling For Mental Health/Depression: Dance Therapy: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dance_therapy

Dance Therapy, or dance movement therapy is the psychotherapeutic use of movement (and dance) for emotional, cognitive, social, behavioural and physical conditions.

It is a form of expressive therapy. Certified dance therapists hold a masters level of training.

Dance therapy is based on the premise that the body and mind are interrelated, that the state of the body can affect mental and emotional wellbeing both positively and negatively.

In contrast to artistic dance, which is usually concerned with the aesthetic appearance of movement, dance therapy explores the nature all movement.

Through observing and altering the kinesthetic movements of a client, dance movement therapists diagnose and help solve various psychological problems.

As any conscious person can move on some level, this therapy can work with any population.

Even standing still, sitting down, or moving hands in protest is considered an expression of movement in dance therapy.

There are several different forms of application of dance therapy, including authentic movement, group work, individual clients, and individual forms generated by the therapist themselves.

Marion Chace is considered the principal founder of what is now dance therapy.
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Re:An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling 12 years 10 months ago #1535

An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling For Mental Health/Depression: Depth Psychology: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depth_Psychology

Depth Psychology is a broad term that refers to any psychological approach examining the depth (the hidden or deeper parts) of human experience.

It is applied in psychoanalysis.

Rather than utilizing techniques, it provides a frame of reference for exploring underlying motives and approaching various mental disorders, with the belief that these frames of reference are intrinsically healing.

It seeks the deep layer(s) underlying behavioral and cognitive processes — the unconscious.

The initial work and development of the theories and therapies by Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, Alfred Adler and Otto Rank that came to be known as depth psychology have resulted in three perspectives in modern times:

Psychoanalytic: Freud's object relations

Adlerian: Adler’s Individual psychology

Jungian: Jung’s Analytical psychology and James

Hillman’s \"Archetypal psychology\"

Those schools most strongly influenced by the work of Carl Jung, a 20th-century Swiss psychiatrist who in his Analytical psychology emphasizes questions of psyche, human development and personality development (or individuation).

Jung was strongly influenced by esotericism and draws on myths, archetypes and the idea of the collective unconscious.
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Re:An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling 12 years 10 months ago #1536

An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling For Mental Health/Depression: Developmental Needs Meeting Strategy (DNMS): en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Developmental_Needs_Meeting_Strategy

Developmental Needs Meeting Strategy (DNMS) is a recent form of adult psychotherapy developed by Shirley Jean Schmidt [1].

It has been used in treating dissociative identity disorder[2] (DID).

It is an ego-state therapy based on the knowledge of how the brain develops in childhood.

DNMS is based on the assumption that present-day issues that originated in unmet childhood needs are perpetuated by maladaptive introjects (see, Introjection).

DNMS is a semi-hypnotic therapy that uses alternating bilateral stimulation to process these maladaptive introjects, build internal resource connections, and strengthen positive experiences.
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Re:An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling 12 years 10 months ago #1537

An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling For Mental Health/Depression: Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT): en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dialectical_Behavior_Therapy

Dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) is a psychosocial treatment developed by Marsha M. Linehan [1] specifically to treat individuals with borderline personality disorder.

While DBT was designed for individuals with borderline personality disorder, it is used for patients with other diagnoses as well.

The treatment itself is based largely in behaviorist theory with some cognitive therapy elements as well.

Unlike cognitive therapy it incorporates mindfulness practice as a central component of the therapy.

There are two essential parts of the treatment, and without either of these parts the therapy is not considered \"DBT adherent.\"

1. An individual component in which the therapist and client discuss issues that come up during the week, recorded on diary cards and follow a treatment target hierarchy.

Self-injurious and suicidal behaviors take first priority, followed by therapy interfering behaviors.

Then there are quality of life issues and finally working towards improving one's life generally.

During the individual therapy, the therapist and client work towards improving skill use. Often, skills group is discussed and obstacles to acting skillfully are addressed.

2. The group, which ordinarily meets once weekly for about 2-2.5 hours, in which clients learn to use specific skills that are broken down into 4 modules: core mindfulness skills, emotion regulation skills, interpersonal effectiveness skills and distress tolerance skills.
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Re:An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling 12 years 10 months ago #1538

An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling For Mental Health/Depression: Dreamwork: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreamwork

Dreamwork differs from classical dream interpretation in that the aim of dreamwork is to explore the various images and emotions that a dream presents and evokes, while not attempting to come up with a single, unique dream meaning.

In this way the dream remains \"alive\" whereas if it has been assigned a specific meaning, it is \"finished\" (i.e., over and done with). Dreamworkers take the position that a dream may have a variety of meanings, depending on the levels (e.g. subjective, objective) that are being explored.

A tenet of dreamwork is that each person has his or her own dream \"language\".

Any given place, person, object or symbol can differ in its meaning from dreamer to dreamer and also from time to time in the dreamer's ongoing life situation.

Thus someone helping a dreamer get closer to her or his dream through dreamwork adopts an attitude of \"not knowing\" as far as possible.

When doing dreamwork it is best to wait until all the questions have been asked - and the answers carefully listened to - before the dreamworker (or dreamworkers if it is done in a group setting) offers any suggestions about what the dream might mean.

In fact, it is best if a dreamworker prefaces any interpretation by saying, \"if this were my dream, it might mean ...\" (a technique first developed by Montague Ullman M.D. and now widely practiced).

In this way, dreamers are not obliged to agree with what is said and may use their own judgment in deciding which comments appear valid or provide insight.

If the dreamwork is done in a group, there may well be several things that are said by participants that seem valid to the dreamer but it can also happen that nothing does.

Appreciation of the validity or insightfulness of a comment from a dreamwork session can come later, sometimes days after the end of the session.
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Re:An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling 12 years 10 months ago #1539

An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling For Mental Health/Depression: Drama Therapy: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drama_therapy

Drama Therapy, also known as the single word Dramatherapy outside the US, is the intentional use of theater techniques to facilitate personal growth and promote health.

Drama therapy is an expressive therapy modality used in a wide variety of settings, including hospitals, schools, mental health centers, prisons, and businesses.

Drama therapy exists in many forms and can be applicable to individuals, couples, families, and various groups.

The use of dramatic process and theater as a therapeutic intervention began with Psychodrama.

The field has expanded to allow many forms of theatrical interventions as therapy including role-play, theater games, group-dynamic games, mime, puppetry, and other improvisational techniques.

Often, drama therapy is utilized to help a client:

*Solve a problem

*Achieve a catharsis

*Delve into truths about self

*Understand the meaning of personally resonate images

*Explore and transcend unhealthy patterns of interaction

Drama therapy is extremely varied in its use, based on the practitioner, the setting and the client.

From fully-fledged performances to empty chair role-play, the sessions may involve many variables including the use of a troupe of actors.
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Re:An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling 12 years 10 months ago #1540

An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling For Mental Health/Depression: Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy: (This article may contain inappropriate or misinterpreted citations that do not verify the text):

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyadic_Developmental_Psychotherapy

Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy is a treatment approach for adopted or fostered children who are thought to have symptoms of emotional disorders.

It was originally developed by Daniel Hughes as an intervention for children whose emotional distress resulted from earlier separation from familiar caregivers.[1][2]

Hughes cites attachment theory and particularly the work of John Bowlby as theoretical motivations for dyadic developmental psychotherapy.[3][4][2].

However, other sources for this approach include the work of Stern[5]. , who referred to the attunement of parents to infants' communication of emotion and needs, and of Tronick[6], who discussed the process of communicative mismatch and repair, in which parent and infant make repeated efforts until communication is successful.

Dyadic developmental therapy principally involves creating a \"playful, accepting, curious, and empathic\" environment in which the therapist attunes to the child’s \"subjective experiences\" and reflects this back to the child by means of eye contact, facial expressions, gestures and movements, voice tone, timing and touch, \"co-regulates\" emotional affect and \"co-constructs\" an alternative autobiographical narrative with the child.

Dyadic developmental psychotherapy also makes use of cognitive-behavioral strategies.

The \"dyad\" referred to must eventually be the parent-child dyad, but it is unclear how the transition is made from therapist-child to parent-child interactions.

Two studies by Arthur Becker-Weidman concluded that dyadic developmental therapy is more effective than the \"usual treatment methods\" for reactive attachment disorder and complex trauma.[7][8][9]

According to the APSAC Taskforce Report and Reply, (Chaffin et al 2006), dyadic developmental psychotherapy does not meet the criteria for designation as \"evidence based\", but the approach has been described as a \"supported and acceptable\" treatment approach in a meta-analysis and systematic research synthesis evaluating treatment for foster children, (Craven & Lee 2006).[10] [11][12].

Becker-Weidman and Hughes state that dyadic developmental psychotherapy meets the standards for non-coerciveness of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children, The American Academy of Child Psychiatry, American Psychological Association, American Psychiatric Association, National Association of Social Workers, and various other groups concerned with treatment of children and adolescents.

Hughes website contains a list of attachment therapy techniques specifically forsworn by him. [13]

(This article may contain inappropriate or misinterpreted citations that do not verify the text).
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Re:An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling 12 years 10 months ago #1541

An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling For Mental Health/Depression: Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT): en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_Freedom_Techniques

Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) is a psychotherapeutic tool based on a theory that negative emotions are caused by disturbances in the body's energy field and that tapping on the meridians while thinking of a negative emotion alters the body's energy field, restoring it to \"balance.

\" There are two studies which appear to show positive outcomes from use of the technique, but another study has suggested that it is indistinguishable from the placebo effect.

Critics have described the theory behind EFT as pseudoscientific and have suggested that its utility stems from its more traditional cognitive components, such as distraction from negative thoughts, rather than from manipulation of energy meridians.
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Re:An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling 12 years 10 months ago #1542

An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling For Mental Health/Depression: Encounter Group: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encounter_group (This article does not cite any references or sources: December 2006)

Encounter Group is a form of group psychotherapy that emerged with the popularization of humanistic psychology in the 1960s.

The work of Carl Rogers (founding father of person centered counseling) is central to this move away from psycho analytical groups towards the humanistic encounter group

Such groups (also called \"T\" (training) groups and \"sensitivity training\" groups) explored new models of interpersonal communication and the intensification of psychological experience.

The first groups were experimental efforts by health researchers and workers, trying to move away from the \"sickness\" groupwork model used in the psychiatric industries of the time.

In later years, these pioneering groups evolved into educational and treatment schemes for non-psychiatric people.

Similar to most therapeutic, educational and treatment tools in the human resource industries, the treatment staff, researchers, writers and clients of these groups tended to be YAVIS persons: Young Attractive Verbal Intelligent Successful.[citation needed]

A commercialized strand of the encounter group movement developed into Large Group Awareness Training.

(This article does not cite any references or sources: December 2006)
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Re:An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling 12 years 10 months ago #1544

An List Of: Talking Therapies/Counselling For Mental Health/Depression: Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR): en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eye_Movement_Desen...ion_and_Reprocessing

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a psychotherapeutic approach developed by Francine Shapiro[1] to resolve symptoms resulting from exposure to a traumatic or distressing event, such as rape.

Clinical trials have demonstrated EMDR's efficacy in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

It has shown to be more effective than some alternative treatments and equivalent to cognitive behavioral and exposure therapies (see effectiveness sections below).

Although some clinicians may use EMDR for various problems, its research support is primarily for disorders stemming from distressing life experiences.[2][3]

The theoretical model underlying EMDR treatment hypothesizes that EMDR works by processing distressing memories.[1]

EMDR is based on a theoretical information processing model which posits that symptoms arise when events are inadequately processed, and can be eradicated when the memory is fully processed.

It is an integrative therapy, synthesizing elements of many traditional psychological orientations, such as psychodynamic, cognitive behavioural, experiential, physiological, and interpersonal therapies.[4]

EMDR's most controversial aspect is an unusual component of dual attention stimulation, such as eye movements, bilateral sound, or bilateral tactile stimulation.

The contention is the effective elements of cognitive behavioral therapy, desensitization and reprocessing, have been rebranded with eye movements as a novel therapy.

As such some individuals have criticized EMDR and consider the use of eye movements to be completely unnecessary.[5][6].

However, more recent studies have found that the eye movement in EMDR correlate with decreases in heart rate, skin conductance, and an increased finger temperature [7].

This is consistent with earlier research on physiological changes associated with EMDR [8].

Also recent studies that have removed eye movement from the method have found the procedure less effective.
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